My new Pinterest

Every so often I would think of how this site needs pictures of some gorgeous hunks to liven it up a bit, or sometimes I want to share some images of some interior design that I like. But to write a post around a photograph that’s not even mine (by the way, the three photos below were taken by me), well I guess it’s okay once in a while, but I think it’s better to just use another platform such as Pinterest and just put the address of the site at the sidebar here if anyone is interested.

I should mention it now so as not to waste anyone’s time: To view the things on Pinterest, you have to join it by creating an account by providing your email address and creating a password. Anyway, my site is at: www.pinterest.com/simplehal

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Thistle Hotel, Johor Bahru, Malaysia

Pinterest is a photo sharing website. It had proved to be useful for my work but I mainly use it as a way to relax. It’s like being sprawled on the sofa lazily leafing through a glossy magazine, but even lazier that that. Because if you come across something nice and you want to file it for whatever reason for later, it just takes a few clicks as opposed to ripping out a page or scanning it.

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Park Royal Hotel, Singapore

I enjoy using it as I get to file ideas, or just images that just strike me as interesting, in neat little folders. They call these folders ‘pinboards’ over there, and the images are the ‘pins’. The first time I used it was a few years ago when a friend asked me to design a shop he’s setting up. I was busy with work commitments, but still wanted to help in some way. I got the idea to start a Pinterest website to compile lots of ideas I thought would be relevant to him, and e-mailed him the address of the site so he could have a look anytime.

And then some time later when we were proposing the supply and installation of terracotta floor tiles for a client, she didn’t quite fancy what she saw in the few catalogues I had in the office. So again I turned to Pinterest to gather images to better relay to her what I think would work for her. The ideas were neatly divided into different pinboards like finish, layout, and pattern. Pinterest is useful and convenient like that.

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Rati Lanna Riverside Spa Resort, Chiang Mai, Thailand

You can also pin images you come across on other platforms, including Tumblr, which I’ve also used on and off for some time as a way to compile images. I used to have 2 or 3 Tumblr sites at any one time. One would be for work, for example design ideas and solutions. Another would be fitness-related for example fitness tips and motivational quotes. Another would serve as inspirational eye candy (let’s just call it that). Also for things like, you know, recipes, things like that. Then it got tedious, having so many sites. I barely use my Facebook as it is.

When I started this latest Pinterest, I thought I would painstakingly bring over all the images that I had collected on my Tumblr sites and previous Pinterest sites, but I decided that would be boring and tedious (read: I’m too lazy to do it). I’d rather just spend the hours idly looking at new images and ideas.

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Related:

  • sheknows.com – Pinterest: What it is, how to use it and why you’ll be addicted

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He’s ready for his close-up

A few days ago, I was browsing through Stomp, a Singapore ‘online journalism web portal‘, and came across a hilarious Thai ad for Watsons, a health and beauty retail chain with many stores in some Asian countries, including Singapore, Malaysia and Thailand.

This is not the first creative ad from Thailand I’ve enjoyed. I think I have come across quite a few so far.

This one promotes their beauty products, and it just cracked me up. I like it a lot. It’s funny thanks to the cute, impish actor who was perfectly cast for his role.

 

Visitor Centre at Bukit Timah Nature Reserve

I’ve always loved ‘traditional’ architecture. To me, it’s not only more beautiful but when it comes to low-rise buildings like double-storey houses, make more sense for example in terms of ventilation.

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I felt such happiness when I came across it at the beginning of my walk there with a friend. Even though it’s not a house. As indicated the above is the Visitor Centre at the Bukit Timah Nature Reserve.

In Thailand, specifically Chiang Mai, they are still making houses that look similar to this, and I think that’s so incredibly cool. I came across new residence that look something like that in recent years. It’s wonderful they still have an appreciation for traditional architecture even when it comes to constructing modern homes with all the modern facilities.

Maybe I’m wrong, but unfortunately this is not the case in Singapore and Johor Bahru. What I’ve seen are only typically modern architecture when it comes to the design of new landed properties, whether terrace, semi-detached or bungalows. What’s crazy is that the interior of these houses (the showrooms I’ve been to in J.B. in recent years) are so damn hot. You need to switch on the aircon almost immediately upon entering. There seems to be hardly enough thought for ventilation, for airflow. The logical solution is to have ceiling fans in every room, yet from what I’ve observed in some houses I’ve visited, some people don’t like the look of ceiling fans, so what happens is the aircon is often switched on for long periods of time when they are home.

Here are a few photos I took of some of the new houses I saw in Chiang Mai the last time I was there a few years ago. So amazing and wonderful how there are people there who still love and appreciate their traditional architecture, and take inspiration from it for their new homes.

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A residence that was still under construction.

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Day 87

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An inspiring life

I saw this sweet video of a Thai ad from the blog Bryan Patterson’s Faithworks a couple of days ago, and I’m still thinking about it. Yeah sure, it’s an advertisement designed to tug at the heartstrings but I love it nevertheless. The story depicts the kind of person most of us wish we were and so strive to be, without fanfare or praise, but just as a matter of habit, quietly and in peace. It also reminds me of someone I have the privilege of knowing, but who I’ve lost touch with, and who I should try to contact again, just to say hi.

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A snapshot in Bangkok

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Day 81

 

 

Eight-year-old girls fighting as Muay Thai boxers

Muay Thai kids, Todd Kellstein, Buffalo Girls

Image is from the documentary film ‘Buffalo Girls’. Taken from buzzfeed.com. Click to go there.

Like many other people, I have come across many stories in the news of many heartbreaking realities for children from around the world. Kids as prostitutes, slaving away in factories, scavenging in massive landfill dumpsters and other horrible inhumane situations.

Well here’s yet another one. I just came across it via Buzzfeed.

I try not to swear. It’s kinda juvenile really. Usually the full word is reserved for my private posts, diary entries meant for my eyes only. For public posts like this I try to remember to put cutesy little asteriks so despite my reaction to whatever it shows up somewhat quaintly as ‘f**k’.

But.

FUCK! FUCK! FUCK!

How the fuck can this happen. How the fuck did anyone allow this to happen.

I tell myself I must not judge. The parents, the officials, the government, the gamblers, whoever, anyone. I must not. I must not. I don’t know the full story.

And sometimes things are just so damn sensationalized as worse than they are. To get reactions like, uhm… mine.

Even the director of the documentary had to grapple with evolving thoughts and feelings. The quote below is from ‘The Story‘ section of the documentary’s website.

“When I first saw the children boxing, I absolutely thought it was horrible,” states director Todd Kellstein. But after spending two years in the rural Thai provinces documenting this world, Kellstein admits that his overall perspective has changed. His initial anger with the parents of the children for putting them in the ring gave way to a resigned empathy for their circumstances. “It is difficult to understand the economic circumstances that lead to child boxing, but what now angers me is economic inequalities in the world. These circumstances exist and we should think of ways to make it better for everyone. Not just in Thailand, but everywhere.”

But, dear God, why.

And why do I bother to be so affected. It’s not like I’m going to help them or do anything to rectify anything. I can barely cope with the shits in my life right now. I need to focus how to right that, and not spend too much time reading about the ten thousand million depressing things in this world. But oh God it hurts about those girls.