A stroll up to Mount Faber Park

At the very start of the Southern Ridges, a 10km walk of trails, bridges and walkways, is the Marang Trail, located right next to Exit D of HarbourFront MRT station. It takes about just 15 minutes to walk the trail, climbing some steps to reach Mount Faber Park, the equivalent of a 24-storey building, according to a guide from the National Parks Board. Perfect for lunchtime, if you happen to be in the area. Grab a sandwich and a bottle of water, walk up there, and enjoy the view and relative quiet while you eat. I enjoy this short walk when I happen to be in the area.

Marang Trail

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Cable cars from the station at Mount Faber Park which go to Sentosa Island. A return ticket costs $26 for adults and $15 for kids aged 3 to 12.

Related:

Related to cable cars in last photo:

  • Singapore Cable Car’s website
  • Trip Advisor reviews of Cable Car
  • The Jewel Card – according to website, the card offers unlimited cable car rides for $39 for individual, and $99 for ‘family’. Click link if you wish to find out more.

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Day 76

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Warning and other signs

I was at Sentosa Island today taking a walk with a Swiss tourist friend. He made an observation that there are so many signs around. What to do, what not to do, this is allowed, that is not allowed. So many rules. It feels a bit like a nanny state where the people are not trusted to do the right thing, or not trusted to use their common sense, so they have everything spelt out for them.

And while talking about that, he mentioned he noticed that when he waits for a train at an MRT station, there are many announcements blaring from the speakers. Give way to alighting passengers! No eating! Report suspicious people and articles! I laughed because it’s true. There are many announcements, and I think most times they come in all four official languages, so yes sometimes it can seem a bit much and annoying.

The discussion of this subject started when we were at Sentosa because we were taking photographs at what looks like this Gaudi-inspired place near the Merlion, and he remarked the following pesky “Please do not enter the pool” sign spoils the view and photo-taking. The same sign was at various points along the whole stretch of the sculpture and water feature.

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I had to laugh and agree with him. At first glance it looks silly. Who on earth would jump into the fountain? But we later decided there would be people crazy enough to jump in and play, kids and adults alike, including to pose for photos. It may look harmless but people may forget it takes just one slip on the wet slippery tiles to knock one’s head against the surface and that’s it. Nasty bruises, if not a lot worse. I’ve actually been there a few times and I recall the signs not being there before, so I won’t be surprised if they were put there after accidents had actually happened. So, it’s ugly, but safety before aesthetic, I guess. Just that it’s a pity that it’s necessary, if really so.

Two of the other signs we came across.

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I guess some admin staff of Sentosa could have felt the same way too about the signs and made an attempt at a sense of humour with these. I didn’t find them very funny, but they did draw out a smile and a sad chuckle from me.

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Day 40 of ‘100 Happy Days‘.

Happy meter: tickled