Long live Bollywood

Just came across this video courtesy of Buzzfeed. I love it. The song, the colours, the handsome men, and of course most importantly the message behind the video.

The happy ending for the couple is the ultimate wish for those of us who love our parents and want nothing more but their acceptance and continued love. Behind the catchy music and the gorgeous sights, that’s the heartrending desire, but thanks to the festive vibe of the video it’s presented in a fun and sweet way, not as some preachy sob story. Nice.

The song and video, called The Welcome, is by the ‘United Nations Free & Equal’, which is an initiative of the United Nations Human Rights Office. Click here to go their website to learn more about them. I’ll be checking it out too. Looks interesting. The video features Bollywood star and Miss India winner Celina Jaitly, who, according to the page for the video, is their Equality Champion. I guess that’s what they call their ambassadors. Good work, Ms. Jaitly.

I also very much love the lyrics, lightly persuading the mother in the story, and us the viewers, to have love in our hearts.

It is a new look, it’s a new attitude

You might wonder where the old way of living has gone

But who is worried about who likes what

As long as in the world of love two people want to be with each other

You and me, me and you – are now unstoppable

So please don’t hesitate, you are always “Welcome” to my home

I love the colours! The joy and intensity. The jewel tones. They are a big part of why the video comes across as dream-like to me. Presented like a dreamscape, a joyous fantasy. If Bollywood ever does an ‘Alice in Wonderful’ type of movie, this would be a great opening, this garden party.

enhanced-4413-1398862938-11

A still of the video by the United Nations Free & Equal, via the Buzzfeed article. Click image to go there.

And I must have that green jacket. God knows where I will wear it to, haha! Maybe I’ll borrow it from him and slip it on in a dream later tonight. Would love to join, sing and dance, and get lost in that party. Oh my goodness, the jewel tone of that velvet green jacket. So beautiful. My next sofa will be of that colour and fabric! And of course I just love how there is so much glorious purple in that video. Long live Bollywood!

'Lotus Love' by Halim

Two hearts. This looks at home here in this post. From a visit to the Jim Thompson House in Bangkok, which I remember had been more interesting and delightful than I had expected.

***

Day 98

Advertisements

Imran Khan vs. homophobia

I totally wasn’t prepared for how awesome this video was going to be. Found it via Gaybros. Where else but that subreddit as a reliable source for interesting gay stuff.

Just a bit of warning that there is that ‘f’ word at 1:50 and 2:10, for those who mind such things.

With winsome humour the video tackles some questions that are actually sad and dumb, but questions I can imagine going through the minds of ignorant, homophobic, or just the insistently hateful who are just hell-bent on putting down gay folks.

I laughed like crazy at so many parts, including the glitter ball and rainbow unicorn to illustrate the ‘gay AIDS DNA’, and oh my God, the stealthy gay conversion weapon. Genius.

But fun jokes aside, this video by the guys at All India Bakchod is really commendable for the effort to address discrimination and prejudice, even while it throws its hands up resignedly with a frustrated sigh at how ridiculous it all is. Sadly, here in Singapore we too have that 377A law which criminalises sex between men.

There is of course another famous Imran Khan, of Pakistan, the celebrated former cricketer who is now a politician. Who is incredibly sexy too, by the way.

But the hotness that is the host of this video with the breathtakingly beautiful eyes, is Imran Khan the actor, who works in Hindi-language films. An Indian American who was born in Madison, Wisconsin on 13 January 1983, (so he just turned 31 yesterday. Belated birthday wishes, you handsome big-hearted man.) Imran studied for and received his degree in filmmaking from the Los Angeles branch of the New York Film Academy. He is also a noted social activist, where he has taken up various causes including the elimination of violence against women.

I’m not familiar with his work, (I drool and fan myself more for his uncle Aamir) but for sure I’m going to be checking out Imran’s films very soon.

Needless to say, but I’ll say it anyway, it is so kind and generous of him to do this video. Risking his career and stardom, and his personal reputation to do this. I may not have watched a single film by him yet, but I’m already a huge fan of him as such a gracious human being.

***

“The point is, that you don’t need cultural approval to live and love in peace.”

imran khan

Image from the tumblr site ‘Imran Khan Fan Club’. Click it to go there.

***

Things to check out:

  • what’s elaichi? in biryani? (2:31) I love biryani. What is elaichi and why is it apparently gross in biryani? Have to check that out.
  • the question in Hindi in 5:01. Have to find the translation.

***

Update 25 January 2014:

  • A blogger I follow Nuwan Sen has kindly provided the translation in the comment section below. I’ll reproduce it here. It’s:

The guy in Hindi, states, ‘that no body has ever been arrested under section 377, do what you want in the bedroom, without talking so much nonsense (i.e. basically stop fighting for your rights, it all about sex and no love).

  • And elaichi is cardamom in Hindi as well as Punjabi, according to Wikipedia.

You Can’t Curry Love

I love this short Indian gay film I came across on YouTube. It’s sweet and earnest and joyful. The actors are so handsome and appealing, meaning the two leads as well as the guy playing the boss back in London. The leads are just the kind of guys that turn me on the most; everyday dudes. Well of course they are way cuter than everyday guys, but what I mean is that they are not effeminate, but not superbutch either, just regular guys-next-door.

Posted in May last year by the filmmaker Reid Waterer himself, it now has got more than 2.2 million views. The film is just about 23 minutes long. I think it’s quite wonderful how just perfectly compact it is, managing a decent enough storyline with great pacing, and featuring interesting set locations. And a great promo for Indian tourism, as it features so many inviting scenes without being an outright advert, yet more than enough to whet my appetite and whisper into my ear teasingly, “Hmm… you know you want to go to India at least once in your life, someday soon.

Below is a still I’ve captured of one of the set locations. I think it is a museum. I’m trying to find out what it is called. Because I love the tile work and the inscription work on the walls so much. And of course an indoor courtyard (with a soothingly trickling fountain) is a glorious thing. So elegant, kind of decadent but not overtly so, and to me there is something so incredibly sensuous about it. I think I’ve seen something similar in pictures of a place in Granada, Spain. I can’t catch its name (or perhaps era) that the character Sunil mentioned, only that it is of the 14th century.

scene in You Can't Curry Love

Clicking this image leads directly to its scene in the movie on YouTube.

Police officers in Pune offered roses to Gay Pride parade participants

Someone needs to make this a winner in some Photo of the Year competition somewhere. It’s amazingly beautiful. I have John Lennon’s ‘Imagine‘ going on in my head now. I’ve never come across anything that did that to me before.

Pune Police 1483296_560621710682585_175786681_n

Photo by Deepak Kashyap, via gaylaxymag.com. Click to go there

It is one of two photographs from an article on Gaylaxy Magazine (love the name) by Dhrubo Jyoti, where I was led to by Gaybros.

Pune, India’s eighth largest city and situated in the western state of Maharashtra, celebrated its third Gay Pride parade last Sunday the 24th. The parade had more than 150 participants and gays joining the march was not just from the city but from other remote districts as well. Dhrubo wrote that:

… the highlight of the event was the support extended by the city police, in particular the cops at the Faraskhana police station. The police officers under Inspector Bhanupratap Barge distributed roses to the queer pride, signaling an offer of friendly cooperation with the queer population.

How brilliantly gorgeous is that.

I was trying my luck on YouTube to see if I could catch a video of the parade in Pune, and came across another heart-warming thing below. By the way, the beautiful human being Inspector Barge mentioned in the quote above is also featured in the video, at 0:53.

According to Wikipedia, when it comes to Gay Pride events in India, Kolkata (also known as Calcutta) held the first one in 1999. On 29 June 2008, it also held coordinated events with the Indian capital New Delhi and two other cities, Bangalore and Pondicherry, with the city of Chennai having its event the very next day. Later that year Mumbai held its first ever formal pride parade, to demand that India’s anti-gay laws be amended. A high court in Delhi ruled on 2 July 2009 that homosexual intercourse between consenting adults was not a criminal act. Attendance at the Pride parades has been increasing significantly over the years.

The documentary ‘Globesity’

It was shown on Channel News Asia several times last week. The trailer looked really interesting so I wanted to catch it but I kept missing it. I’m not some super-busy executive person with some grand exciting life or anything, I just don’t watch TV very often, so I kept forgetting, once catching only the last fifteen minutes of the show.

I discovered some time ago that YouTube has documentaries, in their entirety! I’ve watched several interesting ones produced by the BBC, mostly while I’m doing the ironing lol. That’s my least favourite chore, it’s so painfully boring. So I’m happy to have stumbled upon that; watching documentaries on my computer to make the ironing less boring. (No burnt shirts so far.) Anyway, since I missed Globesity on TV, I thought I’d just check YouTube to see if it’s there, and yay!, it is. Thanks to user liberalcynic.

I find it interesting. Nothing preachy, just some things about what’s going on, and the perfect length at just an hour long. The subject interests me, I guess because I’m overweight haha, somewhat.

The show covers some individual cases from countries such as India, China, Brazil and with a special emphasis on Mexico which is said to have the second highest obesity rate in the world. Mexico is where the documentary begins and ends.

Among many compelling stuff, it suggests how soft drink makers successfully dominate even poor communities as a regular beverage of choice, and that food companies have designed their products to encourage and cultivate a snacking culture so that we think it’s completely normal and acceptable to stuff our mouths all day, instead of sticking to just 3 meals a day for instance.

One very interesting tidbit they included is how the kitchen staple we use for all the delicious deep-fried food we love, came about. The cooking oil for deep frying as we know it. Apparently it didn’t exist before 1950!? For fat the options were just butter, lard, and I guess olive oil. Because of WW2 and the shortage of fat it caused, Japanese and American scientists developed a series of technologies that brought about a way to extract oil from seeds such as corn and soya, and cooking oil was created cheaply.

Another interesting thing that stays with me is that one reason whole foods are important for us is that in whole foods, sugar and fat don’t exist together. For example, we get just sugar in foods like fruits, and just fat in foods like meat. It is in processed foods, for example chocolate, ice-cream, cakes and many other desserts and snacks, that sugar and fat exist together. The reason this combo is bad is because it’s even more pleasurable and harder to resist, so we tend to have too much of it. The thing about the effects of what we eat is that it’s not just related to the digestion of the food but also the way the brain and appetite hormones process the food. I read a bit of additional information from this fun health site called stumptuous.com.

Anyway, I just wanted to note the documentary here because I enjoyed it. It was really interesting and entertaining and I watched it several times already.

By the way, it turned out to be a good thing I missed it on Channel News Asia. One time I managed to catch it on CNA but only the last fifteen minutes or so, and this was after I watched the whole thing on YouTube, and I think CNA had cut out a part towards the end. So there might had been other cuts as well. So I wouldn’t have gotten to see the whole thing on that channel.