Downtown Line’s Little India Station

This greeted me when I exited the train at Little India station.

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The artwork and design on that wall and ceiling are pretty spectacular. I couldn’t help walking around in awe for a few minutes admiring it all, and snapping a few photos.

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I love it. At each of the different angles I saw it.

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It’s like topography, and a flock of birds, and there is whimsy and magic in it. And a Christmas winter wonderland that’s more Tron City than Narnia.

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Chalkboard art

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I saw the above artwork at City Square Mall. I’m a fan of such work. Some time ago, I came across pictures of chalkboard art online and immediately fell in love with them. I find them fascinating, because they can be so ornate and obviously require a high level of artistry, and yet have a down-to-earth tone to them, I guess because we associate chalkboards with childhood and school.

Another thing about them I find interesting is how strong and ‘masculine’ it looks to me even when the piece features intricate calligraphy which can be very frilly. I think this is due to the art being in stark black and white.

Related:

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Day 51

My favourite Liu Kang

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‘Artist and Model’ (1954)

It was a very nice surprise coming face to face with this painting a few days ago at the National Museum. It is part of the ‘A Changed World‘ exhibition ongoing there until this Sunday.

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I was introduced to the artist Liu Kang while taking some night classes in graphic design about ten years ago, and art was one of the subjects. To be honest I didn’t even know of this exhibition. I was just at the Museum with a friend, saw the posters for this, remarked “that looks interesting.” so we went down to the basement where it was located to check it out. It was therefore an unexpected treat to see it.

A bit about the artist from Wikipedia:

Liu Kang (Chinese: 刘抗; pinyin: Liú Kàng) was a Singaporean artist famous for his Balinese-themed figurative paintings. He was a founding member of the Singapore Art Society, and was credited with developing the Nanyang Style.

He was born in Fujian Province and he spent his early years in Malaysia, studied art in Shanghai and Paris, and taught art in Shanghai during the 1930s. Under the influence of Chinese artist and art teacher Liu Haisu (1896–1994), Liu admired, and often appropriated the styles of French-based modernist painters such as Cézanne, van Gogh and Matisse.

Liu Kang came to Singapore in 1942 and had been credited with numerous contributions to the local arts scene. In 1952, Liu Kang, Chen Chong Swee, Chen Wen Hsi and Cheong Soo Pieng went on their historic field trip to Bali in search of a visual expression that was Southeast Asian. Liu drew much inspiration from this trip which inspired some of his latter works.

In 1970, Liu was awarded the Public Service Star by the Singapore Government. He was honoured by the same agency in 1996 with the Meritorious Service Medal. His works, spanning from 1935 to 1997, are a testament of his contributions to Singapore art.

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Day 50 of ‘100 Happy Days‘.

Jelly Baby Family

This colourful sculpture is found in front of Plaza Singapura. Everytime I look at it I’m reminded of Keith Haring, one of my favourite artists.

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Day 49 of ‘100 Happy Days‘.

Itchy fingers touching a painting at a museum? This is a hundred times worse

I was stunned, catching the local news on Channel 5 on the report about the woman who ruined an art installation called ‘Kinetic Rain‘ at Terminal 1 of Changi Airport. And now I’ve read some details about it on Yahoo! News Singapore, from an article by Ms. Jeanette Tan, who reported that the woman appeared to have climbed over a railing and got onto a safety net secured under the art installation, where she then grabbed and pulled at pieces of the hanging art.

Having managed to pull one piece loose, a metallic-looking object shaped like a raindrop, she tied it to her wrist and made her way off the safety net, across a thin metal wire to get to a railing. Like an acrobat! From what I saw in the video below, uploaded by a Mr. Chester Chua.

That’s just disgusting. I love art, in my own general way. I’m certainly no art aficionado, but you don’t have to be one to feel really disappointed and pissed off by such utter disrespect. What the hell is wrong with some people.

The video below shows what the installation used to look like. If they ever get around to repairing it, I’m going to make my way to the airport just to have a look. It looked stunning. I haven’t been to the airport for some time and didn’t know there is (was, rather) such a beautiful art piece there.

Click the link to the Yahoo! News Singapore article in the first paragraph above, to see a photo of what Kinetic Rain looks like yesterday afternoon all ruined, and photos documenting the woman in the act.