Dreamy Island Life

I came across this mural art recently. It’s so pretty. I like the tropical island vibe, the batik style or that’s what I think of it, and the colour palette. These pastels make me think of the 80s.

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Galaxy Cat

I came across this beautiful mural art at one side of Holland Village Market & Food Centre, the side that faces Haagen Dazs.

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Gorgeous, isn’t it. I find it fascinating, even as I feel a bit uneasy as I study it. It rekindles a suspicion deep inside me that I thought I had long banished.

That cats first came from outer space thousands of years ago, landing on our planet to enslave us. Cunningly working their way into our hearts with their fluffy cuteness and by pretending to be hopelessly derpy ever since. But we all know they are forever slyly plotting away in those pretty little heads of theirs on how to finally beat us into total submission. I have frequently caught my cats staring at me with a startlingly evil expression.They came close to domination with the ancient Egyptians, but all their effort backfired when they ended up being mummified along with the very masters they were seeking to destroy after seducing them. Progress has been slow ever since because they kept getting distracted into playtime by glittery things and puking out hairballs.

The designer of my keychain not only agrees with me, but thinks the situation is far more grim than I had thought.

Cats now rule the world

Anyway, back to the mural art.

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Detail 1

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Detail 2

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I am inspired by this artwork to call the next cat I adopt ‘Galaxy’. Or Gal, for short.

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Related:

Graffiti art in Kuala Lumpur

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When we were in K.L., there was a metro station just about ten minutes walk from our hotel, so it was convenient to use their excellent commuter rail system to get around the city for sightseeing. This is the street art we were treated to on the way there, along a canal drain we would cross to get to the station.

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My favourite panel. A kid gazing out a train window at what I’m guessing is the exact spot or area we’re at! The same canal, the same bridges we crossed, the same wall of graffiti. Neat.

Some of the other photos:

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Day 96

Mosaic work on floor

On the drive back from a long weekend trip to the resort town of Port Dickson, my brother and sister-in-law very kindly decided to stop by the historical city of Malacca for Bert’s benefit as he had never been there before, and to grab lunch. We only had a few hours, so we only caught glimpses of three sights very quickly: the A Famosa Fort, the Malacca Sultanate Palace, and the Independence Monument Museum.

I’ll post pictures someday, probably when we have returned there to visit it ‘properly’, as Malacca is a very interesting city-state. One of the smallest states in Malaysia, but one of the most fascinating as it is rich in history and culture. It is in fact dubbed ‘The Historic State‘ and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site with Penang’s George Town.

Damn, wrong intro. After mentioning history and culture, all I’m going to show now are pictures from a shopping mall. Haha, sorry.

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Oh well, it’s just that, across where we ate was this mall with a lot of arts and crafts stalls. After visiting those, we went outside of one of the upper floors for a breather and there was this gorgeous mosaic work featuring what look like pebble stones. And that’s what I want to feature in this post, this really beautiful (to me) and large mosaic work.

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Day 91

 

Sprue Sculpture

A sculpture seen at Raffles Place. I like how it uses a popular toy item to relay its idea. After some checking online, I found that this type of panel of components is called a sprue, thanks to this post.

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What I like about it is the void at the bottom left where there’s a dedicated space for two persons to stand, to be part of the sculpture. I thought that was a cute touch.  DSCN3047_reduced 2

Related:

  • mocoloco.com – TURBO Car Kit Wall Sculpture by Jellio (20 December 2005)
  • jellio.com – ‘Drive-In’ sculpture
  • makezine.com – Life-size boat model kit sprue (16 December 2009)
  • designboom.com – Michael Johansson’s injection molded assembly sets (01 September 2013)

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Day 75

 

Cat sculptures at Cavenagh Bridge

A tourist friend who had visited several times and passed by the area many times was again in town recently. He was excited when he thought he spotted something new as we were strolling around Boat Quay. I told him the cute sculptures of the cats have been there for some time, but I was happy to see his face all lit up and be part of his joy as he regarded the bronze cats with wonder and amusement.

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According to the ‘properties’ of this digital shot, I had taken this photo in March 2004.

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So it’s been exactly ten years since I last said hi. This one was taken about a week ago.

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Day 59

Botero’s Bird

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I love this cute fat bird, with its Boterismo proportions and its little beady eyes. It may look serious and uncomfortable, tense even, but it still has an irresistable air of whimsy that puts a smile on my face whenever I walk past it.

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From Wikipedia:

Fernando Botero Angulo (born 19 April 1932) is a figurative artist and sculptor from Medellín, Colombia. His signature style, also known as “Boterismo”, depicts people and figures in large, exaggerated volume, which can represent political criticism or humor, depending on the piece. He is considered the most recognized and quoted living artist from Latin America, and his art can be found in highly visible places around the world, such as Park Avenue in New York City and the Champs Elysées in Paris.

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This image is from Wikipedia, by the user ‘Jonatancarvajal’, and captioned “Botero Plaza in his hometown of Medellín is a popular tourist site for taking pictures.” Click image to go to source.

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Day 53

Chalkboard art

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I saw the above artwork at City Square Mall. I’m a fan of such work. Some time ago, I came across pictures of chalkboard art online and immediately fell in love with them. I find them fascinating, because they can be so ornate and obviously require a high level of artistry, and yet have a down-to-earth tone to them, I guess because we associate chalkboards with childhood and school.

Another thing about them I find interesting is how strong and ‘masculine’ it looks to me even when the piece features intricate calligraphy which can be very frilly. I think this is due to the art being in stark black and white.

Related:

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Day 51

My favourite Liu Kang

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‘Artist and Model’ (1954)

It was a very nice surprise coming face to face with this painting a few days ago at the National Museum. It is part of the ‘A Changed World‘ exhibition ongoing there until this Sunday.

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I was introduced to the artist Liu Kang while taking some night classes in graphic design about ten years ago, and art was one of the subjects. To be honest I didn’t even know of this exhibition. I was just at the Museum with a friend, saw the posters for this, remarked “that looks interesting.” so we went down to the basement where it was located to check it out. It was therefore an unexpected treat to see it.

A bit about the artist from Wikipedia:

Liu Kang (Chinese: 刘抗; pinyin: Liú Kàng) was a Singaporean artist famous for his Balinese-themed figurative paintings. He was a founding member of the Singapore Art Society, and was credited with developing the Nanyang Style.

He was born in Fujian Province and he spent his early years in Malaysia, studied art in Shanghai and Paris, and taught art in Shanghai during the 1930s. Under the influence of Chinese artist and art teacher Liu Haisu (1896–1994), Liu admired, and often appropriated the styles of French-based modernist painters such as Cézanne, van Gogh and Matisse.

Liu Kang came to Singapore in 1942 and had been credited with numerous contributions to the local arts scene. In 1952, Liu Kang, Chen Chong Swee, Chen Wen Hsi and Cheong Soo Pieng went on their historic field trip to Bali in search of a visual expression that was Southeast Asian. Liu drew much inspiration from this trip which inspired some of his latter works.

In 1970, Liu was awarded the Public Service Star by the Singapore Government. He was honoured by the same agency in 1996 with the Meritorious Service Medal. His works, spanning from 1935 to 1997, are a testament of his contributions to Singapore art.

Related:

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Day 50 of ‘100 Happy Days‘.

Jelly Baby Family

This colourful sculpture is found in front of Plaza Singapura. Everytime I look at it I’m reminded of Keith Haring, one of my favourite artists.

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Day 49 of ‘100 Happy Days‘.